Tuesday - September 29, 2020
State Tipoffs Involving Massachusetts Newsletter for Sunday June 28, 2020 ( 41 items )  

Ameresco Appoints Jonathan Mancini Senior Vice President of Solar Project Development, Eastern Region
FRAMINGHAM, Massachusetts, June 23 -- Ameresco, a provider of energy efficiency solutions, issued the following news release: Ameresco, Inc., (NYSE: AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, announced that Jonathan M. Mancini has joined Ameresco as senior vice president of solar project development for the Eastern region, effective June 8, 2020. In his new role, Mr. Mancini will be responsible for further developing Ameresco's renewables growth strategy in the Northeast,   more

Ameresco: United States Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island Earns Top Project of Year Award From Environment + Energy Leader
FRAMINGHAM, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Ameresco, a provider of energy efficiency solutions, issued the following news release: Ameresco, Inc., (NYSE: AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, announced that its work at the United States Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) Parris Island has received a Top Project of the Year Award in the Environment + Energy Leader Awards program. Organized annually, the program's expert judges identified the MCRD Parris Island project as a l  more

Assumption College: Prof. Borsch's Research on Black Death Recalculates Death Toll Using Previously Unpublished Research
WORCESTER, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Assumption College issued the following news on June 27: Assumption University History Professor Stuart Borsch, Ph.D., recently penned an essay that has been included in Harvard University's Islamic Law Blog, a publication supported by the Islamic law program in Harvard's Law School that is dedicated to promoting research and providing resources for the academic study of Islamic law. Prof. Borsch's essay is part of the blog's Pandemic Roundtable project, a c  more

Assumption College: Understanding Environmental Influence on Human Behavior
WORCESTER, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Assumption College issued the following news: Why do individuals act the way they do? Why do an individual's study routines, exercise regimens, or thought process can differ from a roommate, best friend, or even sibling? It comes down to how we learn and how the environment can affect our behavior. These ideas are studied in the Psychology of Learning (PSY 253), one of the many summer courses (https://www.assumption.edu/explore-academics/undergraduate-studie  more

Baker-Polito Administration Announces Developer for Final Boston State Hospital Property Parcel
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Gov. Charlie Baker, R-Massachusetts, issued the following news release: Governor Charlie Baker and Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito joined Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance Commissioner Carol Gladstone, members of the Massachusetts Legislature, and community leaders in Boston to announce the official selection of Primary Corporation in venture with Toll Brothers, as the developer for the final parcel of land on the former Boston State Hospita  more

Baker-Polito Administration Announces Sales Tax Holiday to Take Place August 29-30
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Gov. Charlie Baker, R-Massachusetts, issued the following news release on June 23: The Baker-Polito Administration announced that the annual sales tax-free weekend will take place the weekend of August 29-30. This marks the second sales tax holiday held under the new law signed by Governor Baker in 2018 that made the weekend an annual occurrence. "The annual sales tax holiday is an opportunity for us to support small businesses and consumers, and this year, it  more

Baker-Polito Administration Unveils $275M COVID-19 Economic Relief Package to Promote Equity and Economic Growth
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 27 -- Gov. Charlie Baker, R-Massachusetts, issued the following news release: The Baker-Polito Administration unveiled a COVID-19 economic recovery package to generate economic growth amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. The $275 million package, designed to promote equity across the Commonwealth, is an update to the Administration's Act Enabling Partnerships for Growth, the economic development legislation originally filed on March 4, 2020. The original legislation was th  more

BayMark Health Services Acquires Second New England Based Suboxone Provider Group
LEWISVILLE, Texas, June 24 -- BayMark Health Services issued the following news: BayMark Health Services has announced the acquisition of Norton Health Care, an office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) provider with a location in Norton, Massachusetts and a second in Salem, New Hampshire. The programs offer medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction with buprenorphine and Suboxone(R), as well as counseling, in a physician's office setting. Established in 2003, Norton Health Care provi  more

Boston University School of Law Names LeBeau as Assistant Dean for Career Development & Public Service
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Boston University School of Law issued the following news: On July 1, Mandie LeBeau joins Boston University School of Law as the new assistant dean for career development & public service. An attorney who earned a JD from Suffolk University Law School and a bachelor's degree in political science from Spelman College, LeBeau has more than fifteen years of experience as a career development professional specializing in the legal industry. The Record recently spo  more

Boston University School of Law: To Serve and Protect Each Other
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 23 -- Boston University School of Law issued the following news: Jon Burge was a serial racist and sadist who tortured over 120 Black men in Chicago in the 1980s and '90s. He placed bags over their heads, burned them with cattle prods, and shouted the n-word while electrocuting them. But Burge was also a commander in the Chicago Police Department who was torturing these men to extract confessions to alleged crimes. And because of the latter, he was never charged for   more

BPS Announces Remote Summer Learning Opportunities
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Boston Public Schools issued the following news: BPS has announced details of remote summer learning programs for students. The majority of summer learning and enrichment programming will run from July 6 - August 7. Following local and state and public health guidance, all summer learning opportunities will be provided remotely. "The City of Boston is committed to providing continued remote learning opportunities, employment options, and enriching activities t  more

Clark University: GIS Students Research Mitigating 'Urban Heat Island Effect' in Mass. Towns
WORCESTER, Massachusetts, June 22 -- Clark University issued the following news: Cities and towns that undergo development can face a rise in air pollution and an increase in urban heat islands, areas that are significantly warmer than the surrounding rural zones due to human activity. Trees can reduce these hot areas -- as long as they are planted in the most appropriate locations. Two Clark students completed projects this spring exploring the best places for tree planting in two Massachusett  more

Communication's Devon Greyson Warns of Public Opinion Survey Contributions to COVID Misinformation in Recent Research Brief
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 24 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: In a recent research brief published by the Canadian online public health resource CanVax, Devon Greyson, communication, warns that the COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by an "infodemic" of misinformation and disinformation, which has been fed by numerous public opinion surveys aiming to assess how health messages have been received. Greyson and co-authors Noni E. MacDonald and Ja  more

Different 'Subtypes' of Alzheimer's May Be Linked to Different Modifications of Tau Protein, Massachusetts General Hospital-Led Team Finds
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Massachusetts General Hospital issued the following news release: A new study reveals a possible biological reason that Alzheimer's Disease (AD) progresses at different rates in different patients. The study, which was led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, focused on tau, a protein found in the neurofibrillary tangles in the brain that are a well-known sign of AD. Tau can undergo a variety of modifications during the course of the disease includi  more

Fitchburg State and Monty Tech Sign New Education Agreement
FITCHBURG, Massachusetts, June 23 -- Fitchburg State University issued the following news release: Leaders from Fitchburg State University and Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical High School recently signed an articulation agreement that will let high school students receive credits in early childhood education toward their bachelor's degrees. The agreement is designed to support students by building on past learning experience and eliminating unnecessary duplication of learning outcome  more

Harvard Medical School: A Fish Called Spondo
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Harvard Medical School issued the following news: A spine is a spine is a spine--or is it? From sharks to salamanders to hawks to humans, vertebrates have backbones in common. Even so, vertebrae can form in divergent ways and have a variety of structures across vertebrate classes. For instance, the spines of teleost fish, which account for more than half of all vertebrates, follow different developmental steps from those of the spines of land animals, includi  more

Harvard School of Public Health: More Evidence of Causal Link Between Air Pollution and Early Death
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 27 -- Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health issued the following news release: Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study, published June 26, 2020 in Sciences Advances, provides the most comprehensive e  more

Mass. Gov. Baker: Independent Investigation Examining the Tragedy at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home Released
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 25 -- Gov. Charlie Baker, R-Massachusetts, issued the following news release: The Baker-Polito Administration released the independent report ordered by Governor Baker to investigate the COVID-19 outbreak at Holyoke Soldiers' Home. On April 1st, Governor Charlie Baker retained Attorney Mark Pearlstein, a former federal prosecutor, to investigate the causes of the tragic events that occurred at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home. The investigation and report was completed in  more

Massachusetts General Hospital: Simple Bed-side Test Detects Bleeding Risk in Patients After Surgery or Major Injury
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Massachusetts General Hospital issued the following news release: Impaired blood clotting after surgery or major injury can lead to severe bleeding or hemorrhage in patients if they are not rapidly treated with blood transfusions. A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a novel, inexpensive and portable device that can quickly and accurately measure the ability of blood to properly clot (or coagulate). Traditional laborator  more

Massachusetts Institute of Technology: A Focused Approach to Imaging Neural Activity in the Brain
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 27 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news on June 26: When neurons fire an electrical impulse, they also experience a surge of calcium ions. By measuring those surges, researchers can indirectly monitor neuron activity, helping them to study the role of individual neurons in many different brain functions. One drawback to this technique is the crosstalk generated by the axons and dendrites that extend from neighboring neurons, whic  more

MIT: Darien Williams - Chronicling Black Resilience to Disaster
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 25 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news: "It's such a weird sort of whiplash," Darien Alexander Williams says, about how he has felt these past weeks. "It's been very strange to go from this quarantine life, to crowds of thousands of people, to inhaling tear gas, to writing emails and answering Doodle Polls and finishing up a paper. And then going back out the next night." The third-year PhD student in the MIT Department of Urban  more

MIT: Helping Consumers in a Crisis
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 25 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news: A new study (https://academic.oup.com/restud/article-abstract/87/3/1498/5673397?redirectedFrom=fulltext) shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy. More specifically, the study finds that one particular form of quantitative easing -- in  more

MIT: Improving Global Health Equity by Helping Clinics Do More With Less
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 26 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news: More children are being vaccinated around the world than ever before, and the prevalence of many vaccine-preventable diseases has dropped over the last decade. Despite these encouraging signs, however, the availability of essential vaccines has stagnated globally in recent years, according the World Health Organization. One problem, particularly in low-resource settings, is the difficulty   more

MIT: Letter to the Community - Pausing to Appreciate Two Supreme Court Decisions
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 22 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following letter by President L. Rafael Reif: Even in these tumultuous times, one pleasure of being in community with each other is rejoicing in each other's victories. This week brought two decisions from the US Supreme Court that stand as profound, welcome, inspiring victories for many individuals at MIT - and therefore for our whole community. The rulings were different in kind and in their immediate   more

MIT: Super-Strong Surgical Tape Detaches on Demand
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 23 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news on June 22: Last year, MIT engineers developed a double-sided adhesive that could quickly and firmly stick to wet surfaces such as biological tissues. They showed that the tape could be used to seal up rips and tears in lungs and intestines within seconds, or to affix implants and other medical devices to the surfaces of organs such as the heart. Now they have further developed their adhesi  more

MIT: When Culture Clashes With COVID-19
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, June 26 -- The Massachusetts Institute of Technology issued the following news: In China, wearing masks during an epidemic is a readily accepted practice -- unlike the situation in, say, the United States or some European countries, where the issue of mask-wearing is revealing civic and political fault lines. To what extent are these differences attributable to the "culture" of each country? And how much have widespread social norms affected the responses of different   more

New Mexico State University Names Carmona as Interim Chicano Programs Director
LAS CRUCES, New Mexico, June 25 -- New Mexico State University issued the following news: New Mexico State University Provost Carol Parker has appointed Associate Professor Judith Flores Carmona as interim director of Chicano Programs effective July 1. Flores Carmona started her tenure-track position in 2012 in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education, with a joint appointment in the Honors College. In 2019, she was appointed as Faculty Fellow in the Honors Coll  more

Northeastern University: Black People are Underrepresented in Medical Research, She Wants to Change That
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 25 -- Northeastern University issued the following news: For as long as Shellaina Gordon can remember, the word 'research' for her has conjured images of white laboratory coats and tubes of solution. But inside those lab coats, she never saw anyone who looked like her. And yet, growing up in a family of seven that has dealt with plenty of sickness, Gordon has always found herself drawn to the field of difficult-to-treat diseases, and specifically the study of the pr  more

Northeastern University: Here's How Artists are Creating - And Surviving - During the COVID-19 Pandemic
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 25 -- Northeastern University issued the following news: In a normal year, artist Silvia Lopez Chavez would usually be out in the Boston area, creating swirls and dives of bright colors along the giant walls that she has made her canvas--like the mural (https://news.northeastern.edu/2019/05/15/silvia-lopez-chavezs-new-mural-on-northeastern-universitys-boston-campus-reminds-busy-commuters-to-pause-and-enjoy-life/) she painted in 2019, on Northeastern's Boston campus,   more

Northeastern University: How to Talk to Kids About Systemic Racism and Anti-Black Violence
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Northeastern University issued the following news: Over the last several months, the United States has seen massive upheaval in almost every aspect of life--the COVID-19 pandemic changed the way people work, live, socialize, and study; and the blatant killing of Black people in police custody has sparked mass protests against systemic racism. These shifts may have left many adults feeling depressed (https://news.northeastern.edu/2020/06/16/pandemic-takes-a-tol  more

Northeastern University: In the Middle of Boston, He's Growing Food for Good
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 25 -- Northeastern University issued the following news: Every morning during the week, Yasser Aponte navigates the tight, densely-packed streets of Boston's Dorchester neighborhood until the streets suddenly, almost without warning, give way to a lush, two-acre farm. It's there that Aponte (literally) rolls up his sleeves, and gets to work.. Row after tidy row of carrots, snap peas, raspberries, soy beans, spinach, kale, cilantro, beets, arugula, kidney beans, lett  more

Northeastern University: Our Drinking Water Was Always Full of Microbes, Are the Wrong Ones Thriving in the Pandemic?
BOSTON, Massachusetts, June 26 -- Northeastern University issued the following news: It's been months. And from rats turning hangry because of coronavirus shutdowns in the U.S., to sea turtles reclaiming tourist beaches in Thailand, life has changed dramatically across the planet. Zooming in where only a microscope can see, Northeastern researchers are trying to determine how the lifestyle changes caused by COVID-19 might be helping harmful bacteria grow in our drinking water. Many buildings  more

Oregon Department of Transportation Selects Ameresco to Complete Large-Scale Streetlight Conversion Project
FRAMINGHAM, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Ameresco, a provider of energy efficiency solutions, issued the following news release: Ameresco, Inc., (NYSE: AMRC), a leading energy efficiency and renewable energy company, announced that it has initiated a streetlight conversion pilot program on behalf of the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), which will involve replacing more than 8,000 high-pressure sodium lighting fixtures with LEDs. The $18.6 Million dollar project is funded by an energy sa  more

Regis College, Mass. Nurses Association Offer Scholarship in Honor of COVID-19 Nurses
WESTON, Massachusetts, June 23 -- Regis College issued the following news release: Regis College is pleased to announce a new partnership with the Massachusetts Nurses Association (MNA) that offers one full undergraduate scholarship for a dependent of a nurse who passed away from COVID-19, as well as two $5,000 scholarships for a single parent wishing to pursue a masters in nursing or a second bachelor's degree in nursing. Additionally, discounted tuition for Regis nursing programs will be avai  more

Springfield College Elects 4 Members to Board
SPRINGFIELD, Massachusetts, June 24 -- Springfield College issued the following news: The Springfield College Board of Trustees recently announced the outcome of its 2020-21 board election results during its annual spring meeting. The Board of Trustees, the primary governing body of the College, is responsible for major decisions and changes on campus, and comprises an integral part of the progress and advancement of the College. James H. Ross, III, resident of Wilbraham, Mass., was re-elected  more

Texas A&M University: Johnson Recognized With Two American Society for Engineering Education Awards
COLLEGE STATION, Texas, June 26 -- Texas A&M University's College of Engineering issued the following news: Dr. Michael Johnson was recently recognized with two awards from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). He received both the Frederick J. Berger Award and the prestigious National Engineering Technology Teaching Award. Having received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University and his master's and doctoral degrees from the Massachusetts  more

UMass Amherst's Institute for Applied Life Sciences Joins Massachusetts Digital Health R&D Sandbox Program
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 26 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: The Massachusetts eHealth Institute at MassTech (MeHI) has selected six new healthcare research and development (R&D) hubs to join the Digital Health Sandbox Network including the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Institute for Applied Life Sciences (IALS), the state program announced this week. The Sandbox Program connects digital health startups to cutting-edge R&D facilities in t  more

UMass Amherst: Common Food Additive Causes Adverse Health Effects in Mice
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 26 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the U.S. and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist. "I think our results have a lot of implications in the food industr  more

UMass Amherst: Partnering to Support Future Teachers in Holyoke Public Schools
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 26 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: In close cooperation with Kelly Curran, of Holyoke Public Schools, and Joan Giovannini, at Holyoke Community College, Beverley Bell and Betsy McEneaney, of the College of Education, have been awarded a state Teacher Diversification Pilot Program grant and UMass Public Service Endowment Grant (PSEG) for partnering to develop a Grow Your Own (GYO) Program. The partnership illustrates the  more

UMass Amherst: Physicist Chen Wang Receives DOE Early Career Award
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 25 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced this week that it has named 76 scientists from across the country, including assistant professor of physics Chen Wang, to receive "significant funding for research" with its Early Career Award. It provides university-based researchers with at least $150,000 per year in research support for five years. DOE Under Secretary for Science Paul Dab  more

UMass Amherst: Research in Land Plants Shows Nanoplastics Accumulating in Tissues
AMHERST, Massachusetts, June 23 -- The University of Massachusetts Amherst campus issued the following news: As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues in China. But "little is known about the behavior of nanoplastics in terrestrial environments, especially agricultural soils," they add. Xing, an  more